Pledges of Human Rights Council Candidates vs. the Reality 2018


According to the UN General Assembly resolution that created the Council (A/RES/60/251, adopted March 15, 2006): "when electing members of the Council, Member States shall take into account the contribution of candidates to the promotion and protection of human rights and their voluntary pledges and commitments made thereto;"

BAHRAIN

The Human Rights Pledge of Bahrain
    "1. The Kingdom of Bahrain is committed to the promotion and protection of human rights domestically and internationally...

    3. The Constitution of Bahrain consists of the principles of equality, justice and freedom and considers them to be among the pillars of society. There is no discrimination between persons on account of gender, race, language, religion or creed...""
    (Voluntary pledge for candidacy to Human Rights Council - Bahrain, A/73/359)
Some of what Bahrain neglected to mention in its pledge:
    "The most significant human rights issues included reports of arbitrary or unlawful killings by security forces; allegations of torture of detainees and prisoners; harsh and potentially life-threatening conditions of detention; arbitrary arrest and detention; political prisoners; unlawful interference with privacy; restrictions on freedom of expression, including by the press and via the internet; restriction of academic and cultural events; restrictions on the rights of association and assembly; allegations of restrictions on freedom of movement, including arbitrary citizenship revocation; and limits on Shia political participation."
    (Country Reports on Human Rights Practices Bahrain 2017, U.S. Department of State)

BANGLADESH

The Human Rights Pledge of Bangladesh
    "2. Born of a heroic war fought by its common people against oppressors, the concepts of human rights and fundamental freedoms stand at the very core of Bangladesh's statehood...

    3. Bangladesh considers all human rights as universal, indivisible, interrelated, interdependent and mutually reinforcing. As for the promotion and protection of human rights, Bangladesh always adheres to the principle of international cooperation and dialogue. "
    (Voluntary pledge for candidacy to Human Rights Council - Bangladesh, A/73/90)
Some of what Bangladesh neglected to mention in its pledge:
    "The most significant human rights issues included: extrajudicial killings, torture, arbitrary or unlawful detentions, and forced disappearances by government security forces; restrictions on civil liberties, including freedom of speech, press, and the activities of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs); a lack of freedom to participate in the political process; corruption; violence and discrimination based on gender, religious affiliation, caste, tribe, including indigenous persons, and sexual orientation and gender identity also persisted and, in part, due to a lack of accountability. Trafficking in persons remained a serious problem; as did restrictions on worker's rights and the worst forms of child labor. There were reports of widespread impunity for security force abuses."
    (Country Reports on Human Rights Practices Bangladesh 2017, U.S. Department of State)

BURKINA FASO

    NO PLEDGE SUBMITTED

CAMEROON

    NO PLEDGE SUBMITTED

ERITREA

The Human Rights Pledge of Eritrea
    "4. Eritrea is a safe, peaceful and stable nation with remarkable harmony among its diverse population. Its evolving political system seeks to foster the broadest possible participation of its citizens at home and abroad, at all levels and in all of the affairs of the nation. Eritrea is working to build a justice system based on a body of laws, including the supreme law of the land.

    5. Eritrea is committed to development that is sustained and equitable and that supports the material, social and cultural aspirations of the people, in particular the youth..."
    (Voluntary pledge for candidacy to Human Rights Council - Eritrea, A/73/360)
Some of what Eritrea neglected to mention in its pledge:
    "Eritrea is a highly centralized, authoritarian regime... The most significant human rights issues included arbitrary deprivation of life; disappearances; torture and other cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment by security forces, including for political and religious beliefs; harsh prison and detention center conditions; arbitrary arrest; denial of fair public trial; arbitrary or unlawful interference with privacy, family, or home; restrictions on freedoms of speech and press; restrictions on internet freedom, academic freedom, and cultural events; restrictions on freedom of peaceful assembly, association, and religion; limits on freedom of internal movement and foreign travel; inability of citizens to choose their government in free and fair elections; corruption and lack of transparency; restrictions on international nongovernmental organizations; violence against women and girls, including in military camp settings and national service positions; human trafficking; criminalization of same-sex sexual conduct; and forced labor, including forced participation in the country's national service program, routinely for periods beyond the 18-month legal obligation. The government did not generally take steps to investigate, prosecute, or punish officials who committed human rights abuses. Impunity for such abuses was the norm."
    (Country Reports on Human Rights Practices Eritrea 2017, U.S. Department of State)

FIJI

    NO PLEDGE SUBMITTED


PHILIPPINES

    NO PLEDGE SUBMITTED


SOMALIA

    NO PLEDGE SUBMITTED


TOGO

    NO PLEDGE SUBMITTED